Monday, October 17, 2011

How not to display quilts

Yes, I know that most people who make quilts do not think of them as art.  Yes, I know that many people in charge of museums and galleries don't think of quilts as art.  Yes, I know that the quilt industry doesn't generally see quilts as art.  But it rattles my cage every time I see quilts displayed for public viewing as though they are nothing more than yardage.

I can't find photos to back up these memories, but have vivid recollections of public museums that displayed small quilts overlapping on horizontal surfaces, so you could only see half.  Once a museum did that with some of my pieces that were on sale as an adjunct to a show where my quilts were hung.  I told them that if that was the best they could do, I would take the for-sale quilts home (they quickly came up with a better solution).

Even if a quilt is traditional and functional, I can't see why a venue that wants to put it on display wouldn't want to have the whole thing visible.  That is, I break out in hives when I see a museum doing this:































































But it's not just museums.  I have been following the so-called Modern Quilting movement, a term that seems to encompass younger people with non-traditional design sensibilities.  I know that most of these people are not trying to make art but rather want to make nice things for their homes.  Nevertheless, I don't see how they're supposed to get much inspiration from pictures that show only part of a quilt, no matter how artfully it's arranged on a chair.
I've been seeing photos like this for decades, quilts flung over fences, draped over benches and patches of poison ivy, underneath cats and on top of sleeping babies.  And I'm sick of them.  If quilts are no more than backgrounds for photo ops or evocative props for lifestyle articles, then fine, disrespect them (and rot in hell).  But if people purport to see quilts as something more important, then please do them the courtesy of showing the whole thing.

89 comments:

  1. Nobody dares to conquer this post. As a newbie to this art quilt world, I will use my naive thoughts and innocence to try.

    I find it offensive to damn anyone's quilts to rot in hell because they don't show an entire quilt in a photo. I am not a Modern Quilt member but I sure do applaud their enthusiasm in making and showing their quilts to others. Nice to see younger people embrace their view of art in a quilt. Whether or not it matches mine.

    But that wasn't the point though , was it? You are condemning improper photographing and cataloging of completed pieces. Yes it would have been nice to see the entire piece. But you could have said it in a more effective manner to promote further growth of the Generation Q blog/magazine. You never know where some of these members might be 20 years from now when we are long gone.

    But not if they are condemned before they have a chance to succeed. Shame on you.

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  2. My first thought was that in some instances, to show the WHOLE quilt would be redundant as in it's just more of the same pattern. Nice to see the whole thing, but not always necessary, maybe, if it's more of the same? But maybe that's the not just "yardage" point. Damning something, or someone, to hell (it's not quite clear which from the statement), is pretty drastic, to say the least.

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  3. I saw some quilts last Friday that were all spread out, but almost impossible to see. The lighting in certain areas of the Pacific International Quilt Festival was just dreadful. That was sad. And some of the quilts were displayed on shiny-white background drapes. Not good either.
    However, what is wrong with displaying a baby quilt over a baby?

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  4. Temper, temper! as my Mum would have said. Who or what has got you so worked up? Chill out. Firstly, it isn't always possible to display all of something. Sometimes venues are just a bit cramped, right? They do the best they can. Secondly, please don't use the expression "so-called" as in: "the so-called Modern Quilting movement". It is belittling to you as well as the people you are referring to. No-one who is trying their best, to do their best, deserves this sort of contempt. It is unkind.

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  5. All I can say is WOW, this is an unpleasant post. I have subscribed to your blogs for a while now and have enjoyed seeing your photos and your quilts and your recipes. I will admit that I don't share your taste in quilt styles, but feel we can all learn from each other and appreciate the work of others. I have to say the I feel that ALL quilts are art and feel that we should never judge a quilt or quilt maker in their endeavors. We are each in different places in our lives and our quilt making skills. That said, I truly feel you crossed the line of decency and kindness today in your opinions about how quilts are displayed. I don't mind if you want to impose these standards for your quilts, but please let others decide for themselves.

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  6. while i respect your right to offer your opinion, i do object to you using a photo of my quilt without my permission. though it is in a magazine and both in print and online, it is not public domain.
    best,
    jacquie

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  7. Yikes, nice way to build a community - not!

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  8. Wow. Offering your opinion is one thing; failing to see the argument of the other side is a problem. Quilts are, quite simply, often shown draped because that's what they are meant to do--drape over a couch or a person or a bed. It's actually important to show quilts as more than flat, static objects because fabric is meant to have a softness and a drape and is meant to move. If they're all flat against the wall like art quilts, you might have well as made them out of cardboard.

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  9. This is the height of rudeness as pertains to Jacquie and I think you should be ashamed of yourself.

    Sounds like you might need a good workout at a gym with boxing gloves and a punching bag to get out some of your aggression and negativity. I hope you manage to do that.

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  10. I never quite understand the venom that I occasionally see on blogs - perhaps it is just an extension of the mean girls phenomenon that we see in the grade schools, junior high and high school? At any rate - you made a huge assumption by generalizing about modern quilters as you have done in this post. I think most quilters (whether they be modern, traditional, experienced or beginners) tend to view their creative endeavors as art - regardless of how they choose to photograph them. I usually take multiple photos of my finished quilts - full shots, as well as artfully displayed images. The vitriol in this post seemed a bit over the top - maybe you were just having a bad day?

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  11. A Quilter's DaughterOctober 17, 2011 at 4:56 PM

    As a photographer, I have to say that you clearly have no idea what you are speaking of. An entire quilt, hung and displayed, is difficult to photograph for a few reasons: (1) keystone distortion. That is, straight edges that end up looking curved or tapered in a photograph. (2) Alluring composition. Jacquie's photography is actually a great example of how to attractively display a quilt for a photograph. An entire quilt, hung and displayed, makes a very boring photograph, that no one wants to look at.

    In a quilt show, however, I agree that they should be more fully displayed.

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  12. With your own quilts, certainly you're able to take them home and not sell them if it makes you feel better.

    But with few exceptions, quilts are made to be cuddled, folded, and loved. I think a quilt draped over a chair has a lot more character than a quilt flat against a cold wall.

    It's an awesome juxtaposition of something homey, warm, and familial with modern art.

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  13. While I can certainly understand your desire to see a quilt in full online, you must remember that e do NOT have to share finished photos of our quilts at all.. instead of wearing your crankypants and trying to tell the world how you think we should photograph our quilts.. why don't you take the time to be grateful that you've seen them at all?

    Often times at quilt shows, museum, and the like - space is limited. You can't always afford enough space to showcase 500 quilts. I would be a lot less offended if my quilt was showcased draped over a chair or had a cat laying on it than I would be if it was shoved in a box or drawer and never showcased at all.

    Grabbing people's photographs however, and using them in a post so desperately rude as this is not only unkind but downright insulting not only to quilters but to yourself and your readers as well.. not to mention those who have made the quilts you're so openly bashing.

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  14. I will agree that you are entitled to your opinion. I don't agree with it but I don't really have to agree.

    I will agree with Jacquie that you should have asked permission to use someone's quilt to ram home a point.

    I do hope that the new quilters with non-traditional design sensibilities are not discouraged by your post. That would be a shame because how else will quilting survive the next century?

    Quilters with blogs should be able to show their quilts in any fashion they choose. I have been quilting for a number of years and I am often inspired when I see a quilt and I don't care if someone's cat is peeking out from under it. But..hey that is just me.

    I will say that if you don't like what you are watching change the channel. We make so many enemies when we criticize. It is so not what quilting is about.

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  15. What a nasty post. I'm done reading your blog.

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  16. People could say the same about your horribly designed blog for which you post your quilts on. If they are such unbelievable pieces of art that should be displayed perfectly in every way then put your money where your mouth is and display your quilt pictures on a blog that took more than pressing the default template button to create. You are RUDE and a hypocrite!

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  17. Truthfully, I make my quilts to be used. Not to be hung somewhere, not to be shown somewhere. I enjoy making them and hope that other people find them enjoyable to look at, but I can't say that I consider them "art". I would be so much happier if someone were to love one of my quilts to tatters rather than to hang it on a wall and stare at it, thinking it art.

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  18. Yuck. You know what I can't stand? People who use the relative anonymity of the internet to slam other people. (I believe that's called cyber-bullying.) Regardless of your opinion of "so-called Modern Quilters", you could be a bit more supportive and objective of those who share your medium as a whole, instead of being condescending.

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  19. an opinion is just that... an opinion and while I'm sure many, many people wont agree with you, it's your opinion...

    On the other hand stealing is stealing and that is just what you've done by using someone else's picture without permission. Doesn't matter how you used the picture - you even could have been extoling its beauty. Using a picture without persmision is stealing. {but I can see that if you use it in a flattering way the owner probably wouldn't have taken offense.}

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  20. I find this so offensive. I feel so angry for Jacquie and the others you've decided to bash the way they choose to display and share their own quilts.

    You don't need to see a quilt in its entirety to be inspired. Use your own imagination and fill in the blanks. The only reason you'd need to see the entire thing is to copy it, no? I personally enjoy the more artistic photos because it shows the quilter has put thought into how he / she wants their work shown. As my mother says, if you don't like it, don't look at it.

    I think that as much as you're entitled to your opinion, quilters are entitled to take pictures and show off their quilts however the hell they want. And your use of these pictures without permission to illustrate your wayward point is in very poor taste.

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  21. You must need a cookie or something...you sound like a seriously cranky person. I personally like keeping my babies warm with the quilts that I lovingly made for them...not hanging them up on a wall for all to ooh and aahh at...how silly.

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  22. So-called Modern Movement? It's not so-called, it's real with or without your approval!

    As for how is anyone meant to get inspired by Jacquie's photo..I mean Jacquie's STOLEN photo...I am hugely inspired by it. The shapes, the colors, the way it's draped over a chair - just beautiful. Looking through your archives and the badly taken photos of your quilts in shows, I feel no such inspiration. I actually really like the red/political quilt you made, but I can't see the quilt in it's glory because of the bad lighting. Jacquie's quilt on the chair is clear and the colors are crisp.

    Your post smacks of jealousy. Look at the number of followers Jacquie has, then look at how many you have. Obviously I'm not the only one being inspired by her work.

    One good thing is coming out of this for you I guess...publicity. Congrats ;P

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  23. Good grief. Do you think it makes you look better to belittle others? (p.s. you owe Jacquie an apology.)

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  24. I'm guessing that you lost quite a few readers today....There's enough bashing in the news. It's unpleasant there. It is certainly out of place here.

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  25. Well, since we are sharing points of view, here is mine...

    I am a quilter, and some of my favorite ways to photograph my quilts is to fold them, drape them, scrunch them... to me this is an important aspect of showcasing the beauty of the work, for they are not stiff and stagnant objects. They are instead objects that move, with a life and a soul of their very own. These qualities can often be shown best in positions that are not flat and static. I want to see the drape of a quilt, the way the fabric changes where the light hits it and the shadows hide. Often that is the supreme way to truly highlight a quilt's texture and unique essence

    I hope that you will reconsider your view, as you seem to have a rather narrow opinion of how a quilt can be displayed, and that's a real shame, as I feel you are missing a lot of the beauty that a good quilt offers.

    And as for calling out how a fellow quilter chooses to showcase her work... it's not cool at at all. Now, maybe you are having a bad day, (and if that is the case, I wish you a better tomorrow) but there are more important things in this world to be concerned about, (such as kindness and integrity) then how someone chooses to display their quilts.

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  26. Well, there is no doubt here, you have raised the ire of almost every type of quilter in the land of blog. While no one is challenging your right to state an opinion, one would think that you might be a little more articulate and less offensive. I suspect there is much more to this rant than meets the eye. It seems rather out of balance for the subject at hand. If posting someone else's photo without permission was an over sight, an important lesson has been learned. If this was intentional and attention seeking, well, there is certainly more going on here. I have never visited your blog before. Sadly, this is the only impression I will ever have.

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  27. My MIL and her quilt group put on a quilt show every year in their small town. My MIL's main goal every year is not to have the best looking show ever, but to encourage quilters in their pursuit of quilting, whether their quilts are pretty or...pretty ugly! They don't turn away a single quilt, and as such, they often run out of hanging room and have some quilts draped on chairs and over tables, just like in your photos. They also have dozens and dozens (usually about 80) of baby quilts donated for charity which they display the same way.

    Should they start turning away quilts because they might have to drape them over a chair?

    I have seen people, both women and men, enter quilts in her show, and though they might not win a ribbon, and their quilt might be draped over a chair, I have seen tears in their eyes and heard them say how happy they are because they never thought their quilt would be good enough to be in a real quilt show.

    Yes quilting is an art form, and those who view it that way enter their quilts in shows which will display it as such. I am just constantly humbled by my MIL's reasons for having a quilt show. We could all do well to remember those reasons.

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  28. I think you've stepped on some big toes with this post...

    I for one enjoy seeing quilts the way they might live in my home. It's not realistic for me to display all of my quilts in full in my home, so I like ideas on how to display them in other ways. The Atomic quilt shows me how beautiful it would look draped over a chair waiting for a snuggle as I watch a sunset on my porch. It's nice when there is ALSO a picture of the full quilt to go along with the 'lifestyle' photo.

    I can understand how you would personally be offended when quilts you want sell aren't being displayed in full. I can also see how you wouldn't be inspired by a quilt that is poorly displayed.

    I don't appreciate the other criticism you've voiced, nor do I appreciate that you've come off as singling out the Modern quilt movement. Quilt making and photo taking are both personal expressions of what the person making or taking feels is beautiful. You don't have to be inspired by all that you see, and if you're not...just move on.

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  29. Run as fast as you can and delete this post. It does not flatter you nor inspire us.

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  30. First time I read your blog. Last time I'll read your blog. Maybe it's all on account of it being close to Halloween and your broom has been misplaced (you can decide where I think it might be). I don't have a problem with your opinion, I have a problem with you thinking that you can damn quilts and quilters to hell for not feeling like you do. I'm with the group who thinks a quilt displayed flat on a wall is boring and like the homey display of a quilt as it is used, on a chair over or under a baby, dog or cat or even wadded up on the floor is much more beautiful.

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  31. Wow, cheery. And wrong. So, so wrong.

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  32. I suppose, if it was your intent to insult those who don't follow your ideas...well done. Hope life continues to be "good" for you.

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  33. Wow....are you bitter or what....Didn't your mother teach you if you don't have anything nice to say don't say anything at all. ( Rot in Hell). WOW......

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  34. I know people use hyperbole for comic effect, and I hope that's what you were doing here. But to use another blogger's photo without permission, to name that blogger, then damn her for not holding the same display views as yours is beyond tacky. It also smacks of envy, perhaps because she is so widely read, admired, and has a book deal. Bad form.

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  35. This is the rudest post I've read. Goodbye to your blog, I'm done reading it.

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  36. This was the last time I will read your blog. There is no reason to be nasty, mean and belittle a fellow quilter - who just so happens to take gorgeous pics of her finished quilts. And a public apology is DEFINITELY in order. I'd much rather look at an interesting photo of a quilt in use than just the quilt - talk about BORING.

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  37. REALLY - "rot in hell" - a bit harsh, no? How those wonderful artists choose to display, photograph, or heck even design THEIR quilts really doesn't concern you at all - but they should "rot in hell" because you don't like it. TSK TSK - shameful.

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  38. Quilts shouldn't be photographed on top of sleeping babies?? ARE YOU KIDDING??? Wow oh wow the ignorance is astounding, as is the lack of your own quilts on your own blog!!!

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  39. A MODERN QUILTER in TNOctober 17, 2011 at 5:59 PM

    I can't say anything more than everyone else has already expressed. I'm just voicing my agreement with the fact that you are being unnecessarily rude and nasty. Quilts are our art and should be used and displayed in any way we damn well please. Personally, I'd rather see one draped over a bed, chair, sleeping baby, or naked man with a burrito if the quilt maker wants to do so!

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  40. How sad you have become so jaded about quilts. Your comments would scare a new quilter to death.No wonder this is a dying art. As a quilt teacher I tell my students to show their quilts as best they can and photograph it as best they can. Not everyone is blessed with a studio or wall space.
    Let's try to help support all quilters no matter what "the rules" may be. Making a quilt should be fun for the maker and fun to share with others.No one's quilt should ever be put down.

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  41. Gee, I thought quilters were nice people. I guess I missed the one grump.

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  42. So who died and made you queen?

    And by the way, plenty of people would say that what you do it not "art", it's "craft".

    So you might consider getting off your high horse and enjoy doing what you do and letting other people enjoy what they do.

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  43. Wow, this post was incredibly unnecessary and tacky. I think you owe Jacquie, and the makers of the other quilts shown (who are not credited *ahem*), an apology.

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  44. Dang girl! Haven't you heard, bullying is out. I am thinking that you need to spend an afternoon reading other blogs and learn how to state your opinion without trashing others' opinions and work.
    Guess what, I don't have to see all of Jacquie's quilt to be inspired. That picture is perfect and I love her quilt. Btw, I hadn't seen it before so thanks for that. Please don't visit my blog because I am a crappy photographer and I don't want to be judged.
    I am not a beginner quilter, nor am I young, but I have embraced the Modern Quilt Movement. I don't know why some traditional quilters seem so threatened by this 'so-called' movement. Obviously, you may in some way feel threatened by it or you wouldn't have belittled it with the 'so-called' phrase.
    I do consider my quilts my art and I want them to be used, as quilts. The first thing I do when I finish a quilt is throw it in the washing machine......then the dryer...gasp!! They are made to be used, loved, appreciated, and (yup) folded and dragged around. That's how I feel about my quilts, how you choose to value yours is your business.
    Finally, I would like to say that the 'rot in hell' part is very nasty and unnecessary. Just my opinion. This was my first time here, I won't be back. You will get a lot of traffic out of this but I doubt that it will last.

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  45. This entire post was totally uncalled for. You must be a very ugly, jealous person to have singled out a whole section of the quilting world that you are not part of and especially Jacquie and her beautiful quilts...however they are displayed are amazing!

    SHAME on you! You were obviously not taught any manners, or maybe they just landed on deaf ears.

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  46. I'm a firm believer that everyone is entitled to their opinion.....well, here's my opinion that I'm entitled to: Your opinion stinks!

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  47. I am stunned at what a bitch you are.....and ugly to boot, but that is just my opinion!

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  48. Wow. This was a rude, harsh post and using someone's own handwork as a negative example is simply appalling. I regret that this kind of negativity appeared in my reader. I am no longer a follower.

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  49. P.S. Can't something be artistically draped and still considered ART? Since when did art need to be 2 dimensional?

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  50. You certainly understand how to be rude and offensive in your posts. Geez lady get a grip. It's a quilt! to be used to cover up and handled and touched and fraped yes DRAPED!!! Even folded. It is fabric not the Mona Lisa lady! Yes it is art! No matter what their use but it is not on wood or a piece if canvas. It moves! You are horrible to even state that the Modern Quilt Guilds are not all with it. I am not a fan or old fashioned Civil War quilts but I appreicate them and I am glad that quilters still make them I would never condem anyone to hell for making a quilt styled from the 1800's in the year 2011. Things change. Get a grip on life lady. I think it is time to put your big girl panties on and deal with the changes in the quilting movement. Imagine if we were still having to use rotary phones or aghast plain shears to cut out a quilt and not a rotary cutter! For shame if you are using a rotary cutter since you seem to be stuck in the past in your views on quilting. And you should also be doing only hand quilting. I am appalled at you if you are using a sewing machine to quilt I mean that is how quilting is done these days right only by hand in your view? Things need to stay the same and not change in the quilting world? Yep not reading your blog anymore Hope you have some readers left

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  51. I prefer to see quilts draped - I think nailing them to a wall and having them flat out straight detracts from their beauty. Part of the allure of quilting is the way the lines and colours bounce off each other. And I like to see them kept real - they are, after all, meant to be useful. If you see them as art then OK. Not many other people do.

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  52. Looks like the mommy bloggers got riled and decided to gang up on you. Sheesh, nothing like inter-generational warfare

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  53. My goodness! I can't believe all of the mean responses to this post! I feel compelled to write to express my support to you. I happen to agree with your point and didn't feel that you were condemning anyone's work. I cannot say that for the responses you have received on this blog. Surely we are better than this. I am a painter and a quilter and a dollmaker. I *do* want to see the entire quilt hung so that I can get the full view of the work (I don't think it's redundant). I have seen people mistreat quilts on display (eating and drinking around them, stepping on the bottoms) because they were not displayed properly or in my mind respectfully for the time, energy and artistry that went in to them (this happens when people believe that if it's made from fabric it couldn't possibly be art). We all feel strongly about our work. I have a quilt that my great grandmother made. It is worth more than the Mona Lisa to me. Like most folks, I have strong preferences for what I like and dislike. I definitely think it's wrong to poo all over another quilter because she expresses an opinion I disagree with or doesn't like what I like. Like I said, we are better than this.

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  54. Wow. I'm glad I never wasted time reading your blog. Why don't you spend your time more useful, clean up your studio and your attitude about others who love to quilt and share their work.

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  55. Deborah - can't help it I've got to say something. You said "I agree ... and didn't feel that you were condemning anyone's work" -- WHAT -- did you not read "and rot in hell"? Isn't that about as condemning as you can get!

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  56. I think the tone of these comments were in response to the tone of the post. This is exacty what she was hoping for in the rude abnoxious post.

    I am not in the MOMMY catgory someone has mentioned, I am past that stage and am appalled at the way this blogger has used the forum to spew hatful thigs about others and use their images to boot. It shouldn't matter what age you are rude spiteful comments are just that....rude!

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  57. I'm very disappointed in a post like this. I do agree with previous comments that this could definitely fall in the cyber-bullying category. The sad part is, I truly wonder if you posted something like this to get more people to your site.

    Either way, that was just mean. I bet you've lost some readers with this one.

    Most photographs of a full quilt is pretty boring anyway.

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  58. I'm not a huge blogger--but I made my way to this post via another. I consider myself a quilter--and don't really consider the quilts I make "art." I think most quilts are made to keep people warm. I received a gorgeous quilt made by two friends for my son...he sleeps with it every night, and I have pictures of him sleeping under it. You just sound bitter (rot in hell?--over the way a quilt is photoed?) You would probably get your panties in a SERIOUS wad if you saw the Maytag commercial with the cute little quilt in it.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR1Gucq6928

    Lighten up!

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  59. Stealing pictures to provide fodder for your blog is reprehensible. You should be ashamed. Failing to take down said pictures after being told by the owner that you expressly do not have permission to use them, just shows that you have no respect for others.

    I actually get quite a lot of inspiration from Jaquie's quilt photo's. I like to see how a quilt would look in use and staging a quilt folded, bundled, or draped gives me a good idea of how her patterns would look IRL.

    Obviously, Jaquie knows what she is doing. She is a successful author, pattern maker, and blogger. She manages to fill her blog with inspirational posts, all using her own photos and photos she has permission to use. I've also never seen a post on her blog where she felt the need to tear down others work to prove a point. Whereas I never heard of you before today and you have made about the worst impression a blogger/copyright violater could.

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  60. It's funny, I will never understand why some people don't get that if you want to make an argument that people will take seriously, it's best to leave the personal insults and inflammatory language out of the picture. Imagine this post written something like "It can be frustrating when I see a photo of a particularly beautiful quilt, but the quilt isn't shown in its entirety. I so prefer when people take photos that show their whole quilts -- it helps me better to use them for ideas and inspiration!" See how easy that was? People might disagree with you, but you keep the dialogue as an adult discussion, while making the same point. And as a bonus, you get to NOT hurt people's feelings, too.

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  61. As far as quilting magazines and blogs that quilters write as show their quilts in; they are in a way selling a product, selling a lifestyle, selling an idea. They are showing the quilt whether just for a finished product picture or to sell a pattern in ways people would use them or ideally like to have them in their own homes. Pottery barn, Martha Stewart and alike all do the same 'staging' to set a tone, feel and get the viewer somehow emotionally connected. I feel Most of the time art hung gives the viewer a detached view of the product. But that is I guess just my opinion. Oh and look I managed to put my thoughts down without offending anyone. Imagine that. Bitch.

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  62. seeing every single quilt hung flat on a wall gets boring, very boring, especially when the quilt has the same all over design on it. I think it looks great when it is draped over something like a bench, or a cat laying in the middle of a quilt puddled on the table top. They feel much more homey and give a sense of comfort. That is what quilts are all about. I can't see why anyone would have to rot in hell over it.

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  63. Quite obviously a blogger with NO class and all that implies. Enough said

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  64. All I have to say is how embarrassed I feel for you.

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  65. As others have said, you are certainly entitled to your opinion but it would have been much more appropriate to take your own photos showing what you do and don't like about quilt displays instead of the route you took. Jacquie handled it with class that would have been hard for me to find if I was in her position.

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  66. How vitriolic and negative. Yours is definitely not a blog I will be following.

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  67. Wow. Almost 70 comments, and a mere 1.5 people had something positive to say to you. I hope you've learned a lesson on how to alienate your readers. You absolutely owe Jacquie an apology, and should take down her photo immediately. Shame on you.

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  68. Wow - you are completely rude and obnoxious. And could benefit from some serious time in a photography class.

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  69. Wow...WOW how rude and uncalled for. I love the quiting community and I am glad I am not part of your quilting community. You should be ashamed.

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  70. This is bound to be the most popular post on your blog. Unfortunately, not in a good way. I came here from Tallgrass Prairie and am dismayed that you hijack her photo of her GORGEOUS quilt to make your (stupid) point.
    yar boo sucks to you
    lore
    x

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  71. Paintings in a gallery are not lined up against a wall for the view to try to figure out what they are looking at on the floor.
    Quilts slumped over objects when they are on display, are not casually placed, they are 'put' somewhere, because more 'important' work is hung up.
    The creativity and effort you put into your work, and the support you give other quilters and artist makes your voice all the more important to future quilt artists.
    In the context of a show like the Sisters Quilt Show, where the entire town is set up to have a cohesive "look" and the quilts ARE displayed appropriately to the theme of the town and the show, the sponsors and the artist, THEN it is the 'right way to present quilts' for that show.
    I worked in an art gallery that showed quilts as art. I can assure you, they were hung on the wall. They were given strong showing and people loved to approach them, and ask questions. We sold A LOT of art quilts that way.
    Nan

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  72. I am so thankful as a relatively new quilter that I did not see posts like this when I started...I would have ceased quilting attempts at once! Who do you think you are? To take from someone without their permission...and to use the fruits of your theft to trash their point of view is both tacky and in many arenas...considered slander. How dare you attack someone else's art just because you don't agree with the way it is displayed! Oh wait...you must know everything...after all...Money's Water Lillies were once considered trash...because they did not conform to "standards" of the art police. And how are those "police" remembered now?

    You are entitled to your opinion...but to speak ill of another because it does not match your opinion is just plain wrong. Don't apologize for your opinion...but apologize for your rudeness, that would be the decent thing to do.

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  73. quite frankly, who the hell do you think you are?

    I don't think you deserve any more of my time

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  74. Hey, everyone, you need to stop following this blog!

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  75. Kathleen's blog title is, "Art With a Needle". Quilting deserves
    status with other forms of art and should be displayed correctly.

    Have you ever been to an art gallery and seen paintings on the floor leaning against the wall?
    No.

    What Kathleen is saying is that often,people who should care, don't seem to care how a quilt is displayed.

    There are situations like the Sisters Quilt Show which is held in that quaint Western style town in the Oregon for one weekend in July.
    The town is resplendent in quilts! There are hundreds to be seen and enjoyed, and they are everywhere. There are quilts hanging from railings,roof tops, store fronts, the exteriors and interiors of buildings and shops. The town is filled with with quilts of all kind.

    Kathleen is not just saying that all casual presentation is wrong.

    I believe she is talking about presentation displays SO CASUAL THAT IT APPEARS CARELESS.
    So COMFORTABLY DISPLAYED AS TO BE A LAST THOUGHT.
    I worked in an art gallery and we always had a couple art quilts displayed.
    Each one was given a special location, no UV exposure, excellent gallery lighting, Each was showcased so the viewer could stand back to see all of it, and come forward to study details.
    oos and ahs!!and sales, resulted.

    They sold because hey were wonderful, unique, and given the space and lighting they deserved!

    Kathleen wants all of our work to be honored, photographed and hung as well as the effort that has been put into making them!

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  76. I still love you.
    Too much walnut ink, I think.
    It is a disservice to the maker if a piece is not properly displayed.
    A painter would not like their work proped up on a chair.
    I think that was your point.
    Cheers Love Jan

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  77. WOW, somebody has their panties in a bunch. Seriously though....why are you so jealous? Because modern quilting is so popular right now, and yours isn't?

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  78. This whole discourse makes me very sad. It seems that because we have perceived that someone has been rude, it allows the rest of us to respond in kind. Unkindness breeds unkindness. And when there are so many unkind remarks, they seem to get worse as one reads down the list. Lets each remember how we would like to be treated and respond that way.

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  79. Actually, for those arguing that "paintings on on a wall!".... if you go to modern art galleries, or sculpture galleries (who decided quilt = painting anyway?), not everything is flat on a wall. Things are leaned. Things are on the floor. Pieces are displayed AS THE ARTIST HAS STATED THEY BE DISPLAYED. So, whoever makes it, gets to decide how it should be shown. Simple solution, everyone's happy (as long as they stop caring about other people's belongings!). Ta da! :)

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  80. "The quilt in progress was meant to hang in a grid in space, and as I worked I would generally imagine it that way.  But this particular morning I noticed how delicious the little bits of fabric looked in their tangled heap, and resolved that my next postage stamp quilt would include a heap.  I made this quilt about a foot longer than it needed to be, and asked that it be hung so the bottom part would pile onto the floor.  Except for the day we photographed the quilt, I've never seen it installed and am looking forward to it."
    This is a quote from you...May 2011

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  81. Please, please stop. I feel shame reading some of the comments here. I follow Jacquie's blog and I love her work; however, I believe she wouldn't want supporters/followers to be so hateful.

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  82. Kathleen, I found your post to be a bit negative but I find the personal attack on you very tragic. I love both Jacquie's and your work.

    I see no reason to write spiteful comments when a blogger says something one doesn't agree with.

    Hang in there....this can't be easy for you.

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  83. Wow. I'm all for "free speech," but all I can think about is how it isn't for anyone to judge what is "right" about how we show our quilts. I recently took a bunch of my quilts and took photographs of them over gates, fences, etc., and they're the most beautiful photos I have of any of my quilts - and the entire quilt is not shown. The photos are not for the purpose of turning in for judging, they're for artful photos of my quilt making efforts.

    While you did show a photo that I was surprised about, still - we don't know the purpose of that particular set-up for the quilt. Maybe there was a purpose for it, even if we don't "see" it.

    I kind of think that, if quilts were meant to be photographed "in whole" all of the time, we wouldn't be able to "fold 'em up" like we can. A painting in an art gallery can't be folded, so go take a photo of the whole thing - I get that. But quilts are MADE to be wrapped in, laid upon and under, folded, hung, etc., and deserve to be photographed in all of those "positions."

    I know you're getting nailed here, and that's kind of sad. But I guess it's also sad that you used photos that you didn't have permission to use in a post that was basically rude and lacking respect. I bet you make beautiful quilts, and I hope that there is never a situation where your quilt is photographed in any environment where it is not "perfect."

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  84. I think this sums up how most of us feel:

    http://youtu.be/0la5DBtOVNI

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  85. Wow. What an offensive, over the top post. You're way out of line, lady.

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  86. This makes me sad. I don't identify myself as a modern quilter or a traditional quilter. I'm simply a quilter. As such, I'm influenced by my mother as well as both of my grandmothers. So perhaps I lean towards traditional.

    And traditionally, quilts, while beautiful and artistic, were meant to be functional. They were meant to cover people. They were originally stored, folded, in hope chests. Then later spread on beds, wrapping loved ones in warmth, comfort and love through tiny stitches and recycled fabric.

    I respect your desire to see your quilts hung properly. I think it's fantastic when quilts are featured in shows at art galleries or museums, but I'd prefer to see them as they're meant to be, as they were originally - soft, folded, loved and in use.

    Not all art needs to be hung on a wall - flat, uninspired and 2 dimensionaly.

    Please, by all means, display your work as you see fit.

    But respect MY decision for how my work is displayed, photographed and ultimately used and loved.

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  87. A person is entitled to write whatever she wants on her own blog. If you find what someone writes offensive, then just don't read that blog anymore. I think most of the comments here are far more offensive than the blog entry given that the commenters are essentially guests here. If you disagree with what is written, say so politely but don't vilify the blog owner for her opinion and what she chooses to write on her own blog.

    I agree that I much prefer to see a full picture of the quilt because I can't necessarily figure out what it really looks like from a draped picture. Don't get me wrong, I like seeing the pretty magazine-style pictures but I don't like it when that's all there is, especially when it is for a pattern.

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  88. Artists are temperamental, outspoken, quirky, creative, smart and sometimes just a little bit eccentric. Sometimes an artist’s opinion is viewed as judgmental. When that happens, it’s prudent to look a little deeper. Artists absorb, evaluate, accept and reject the work of their peers, but always with underlying respect for the art. I find nothing offensive about this artist’s exploration into the relationship between art and environment. The two are intimately connected. I do take exception to Kathy’s imagery that the disrespect of art by environment should cause the perpetrator to “rot in hell”. Assuming hell does exist in keeping with our conventional understanding, the correct phrase would be “burn in hell”. It isn’t the art burning, or the artist burning. It’s the disrespect by environment.

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  89. Umm, wow. I've been going through your old posts because you provide lots of excellent info and food for thought. Then I came across this one and the 'apology' post. I'm done with your blog, this is beyond rude.

    If blog traffic is what you wanted, you succeeded in the short term. Ultimately, you're denigrating your own work.

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